Media from “Introduction”

  1. AIDS Treatment Center, Stony Brook
    • This image depicts panel #3335 of the AIDS Quilt. This particular panel was used for the first source description, and has been at the center of the project from its beginning. The panel is a representation of my work because the center from which it came is what I used to for my research. Although I look into the stigma around opioids, I use the Stony Brook Center as a frame through which I viewed these stigmas.
    • “Aids Treatment Center Stony Brook” panel. The AIDS Quilt. The NAMES Project Foundation, 117 Luckie St. NW: Atlanta, GA 30303.

 

Media from “A Snapshot of the Stigmas of HIV and AIDS”

  1. Ryan White
    • This is an image of the 13 year old boy named Ryan White retrieved from page dedicated to information about him . In my paper, I introduce him as a representation of the stigmas surrounding HIV/AIDS in the height of the epidemic. From this, I am able to transition to Stony Brook and how it breaks these stigmas discussed in this section. Because of this, the image and the information about it play a crucial role in the paper’s information flow.

  • “Who Was Ryan White?” JPEG. Retrieved from: https://hab.hrsa.gov/about-ryan-white-hivaids-program/who-was-ryan-white

Media from “The Stony Brook AIDS Treatment Center”

  1. Stony Brook Hospital and Medical Center
    • This image depicts the Stony Brook Medical and University Hospital in the modern day. It was included to add to the knowledge of the audience and to act as a rhetorical method of ethics. By seeing the aesthetic of the center, the audience can accredit the center with its success and feel what I am trying to convey. An elegant looking building is more likely to receive acknowledgement and support than a run-down, sketchy-looking building.
  1. HIV Testing and Counseling by Peter Mastrionni
    • This image depicts an article that I reference in the paper. I incorporated this image because it allows the audience to read the article and make connections to the thesis of my paper themselves. It also validates the thesis because of the emotions and care expressed by the author. The legitimacy of the author’s concern for his peers with HIV/AIDS helps make the case that the HIV/AIDS center at Stony Brook was a crucial resource for students of the school in that he somewhat puts his trust in this center to help these infected students.
    • Mastroianni, Peter. “HIV Testing and Counseling.” The Statesman [Stony Brook, NY], JPEG. 5 May. 1994, pg 14.

Media from “Other Examples of AIDS Treatment in New York”

  1. AIDS Institute Logo
    • This image depicts the building of the AIDS Institute in New York. It is a screen shot taken from a 3-D simulation provided by Google Maps. In the paper, I make a connection between Stony Brook and other institutions that provided similar care. The purpose of this image is to show the audience what the AIDS Institute looks like in modern day.
    • “Screenshot of the AIDS Institute.” Google Maps. PNG. 27 April. 2018. Retrieved from: https://www.google.com/maps/
  2. Cabrini Medical Center Panel
    • This image showcases a panel from block #5339 of the AIDS Memorial Quilt. This image was included because one of its connections to Stony Brook is that this center also created a panel. In addition to this, it is used as a transition from the AIDS Institute to the Cabrini Center. Its color scheme and design is an attention-grabber which helps the flow of the paper.
    • “Cabrini Medical Center” panel. The AIDS Quilt. The NAMES Project Foundation, 117 Luckie St. NW: Atlanta, GA 30303.
  3. Man receiving experimental AIDS treatment at the office of Dr. Jeffrey Wallach, New York, 1991
    • This image depicts a man receiving an AIDS treatment at the Cabrini Medical Center. This image was used to make a connection between Stony Brook and the Cabrini center. Through this image the reader can make the connection that the centers had similar functions and, therefore, are similar to each other.
    • McGovern, Thomas. “Man receiving experimental AIDS treatment at the office of Dr. Jeffrey Wallach, New York, 1991” http://www.loc.gov/pictures/item/00650419/
  4. Dr. Jeffrey Wallach visiting two of his patients at Cabrini Medical Center in New York–The patient on the left is HIV-, the patient on the right has AIDS and had just received a Hickman catheter, 1991
    • Much like the first image, this image depicts Cabrini Medical Center’s doctor Jeffrey Wallach. The purpose of this image is similar to the one before in that is used to make a connection to the Stony Brook Center. I also used this image to make an emotional connection to the audience. I wanted to show that although this is history, these are real people that were affected.
    • McGovern, Thomas. “Dr. Jeffrey Wallach visiting two of his patients at Cabrini Medical Center in New York–The patient on the left is HIV-, the patient on the right has AIDS and had just received a Hickman catheter, 1991” http://www.loc.gov/pictures/item/00650421/

Media from “The Stigma of Opioids”

  1. Figure 2
    1. This image depicts the molecules of Oxytocin, a hormone that regulates social behaviors, and heroin. It used to showcase the similarity of hormones and opioids that I reference in the paper, and it helps establish the logos of the author of the paper I referenced.
    2. Volkow, Nora D. “Figure 2.” America’s Addiction to Opiods: Heroin and Prescription Drug Abuse. https://www.nih.gov/sites/default/files/institutes/olpa/20140514-senate-testimony-volkow.pdf
  2. Burenorphine

Media from “Synthesis and Conclusion”

  1. AIDS Treatment Center, Stony Brook
    • Once again, I use this image in the conclusion to drive the point of the paper. It also used to tether this panel to Stony Brook and the purpose of the paper– to show how Stony Brook broke through the Stigmas surrounding HIV/AIDS, and how health institutions must also do this to help the opioid crisis.